INTERVIEW: JOHN SEBASTIAN

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“It was simply a matter of ‘What do we have that everybody doesn’t have?’ Let’s see. Bob Dylan songs? Let’s not have any of those. There was all kinds of rules. No Epiphones. No Rickenbackers. No 12-strings. We were on a very strict tear as far as stuff like that goes. But the important thing was that we wanted to reflect our own influences. Zally and I weren’t mono-inflected in our background.” 

John Sebastian at length about a half century in the music business, the tricks he learned composing for five-year-olds, the credit that’s still due to Zal Yanovsky, what it’s like to have Beatles, Kinks and Clapton stealing his moves, and the joy in being able to still revel in and perform jug band music as he pleases. Oh yeah, and why Cass Elliot said he and Zal might as well have been a pair of 16-year-old girls …  Continue reading

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FIVE QUESTIONS: JOHN SEBASTIAN

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Still living the life of a troubadour (and jug band man), the former Lovin’ Spoonful frontman takes five from us … (Welcome back, welcome back, welcome back!)  Continue reading

INTERVIEW: CRISPIAN MILLS

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“I think Kula Shaker was an anomaly, really … It was a weird time, but it was nice to be surprised by pop music. To think anything can happen. I like to think that Kula Shaker were also part of that surprise. We were doing things that people weren’t expecting and it was very creative.”

Crispian Mills at length about Kula Shaker coming full circle 20 years after recording their debut album, K, navigating the music industry before and after the “atomic war” of downloading that befell record labels in the aughts, returning to the US at a time of worldwide nervous breakdown, and the similarities between producing movies and music. Oh, and that feeling you get when you’re handed the bill for recording an album on Dave Gilmour’s boat …  Continue reading

FIVE QUESTIONS: CRISPIAN MILLS

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On the eve of Kula Shaker’s first return to stateside touring in 17 years, the band’s frontman (and former Jeeva) takes five from us.   Continue reading

INTERVIEW: HOWIE PAYNE

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“We don’t live in a world where there’s one music industry anymore. I don’t know if we ever did, but it used to seem that there was one music industry that existed—like this great big river that would run forever forward, and the jobs of musicians when they were starting out was to somehow catch a ride on a boat on that river. The boat being the record label that would take you down through this industry. ‘These are the pipes, this is where they put your music, it goes to the store, the people buy it.’ We know that doesn’t exist now, so we’re looking at multiple ways you can get your music out and it can exist.”

Howie Payne at length about getting the bug to release new music, navigating the unknown in the music industry’s new world, the importance of the groove, the heavy sound of the Stands that never translated to record, and the fertile ground that Liverpool provides for young musicians. Oh, and also why you should always wear Adidas.  Continue reading

FIVE QUESTIONS: HOWIE PAYNE

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Readying a new dose of solo material, the one-time Big Kid and Stand (or Howard Eliott Payne, if you like) takes five from us.  Continue reading

HISTORY: “SOOTHING MUSIC FOR STRAY CATS”

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“There’s loads of bands in Liverpool pretty well fixated with the 1960s, which is fair enough considering we all but invented it. But not many artists are brave enough to go back to the roots, and Edgar was. His musical knowledge is something else.”

On the eve of Soothing Music For Stray Cats being made available for the first time on vinyl, Edgar ‘Jones’ Jones and those who helped bring the 2005 LP to life reflect on its origins, making, legacy, and lasting impact on both Liverpool and the indie music scene at large … Continue reading

INTERVIEW: ANDY BELL

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“You can’t fake it. You’ve either got it or you haven’t. That’s what bends my mind about the life I’ve had, because I’ve played in bands that have had great chemistry, and I’m still very lucky about that. I mean, obviously Ride had a good chemistry because we were all school friends … The version of Oasis that I was in—we really did have a great chemistry on stage, even though it wasn’t the quote-unquote ‘classic’ lineup. We still had something special. You can’t go on stage at River Plate Stadium in Argentina and just be five guys on stage and tear it up like that.”

Andy Bell at length about the Ride reunion (and the possibility of stretching it past a handful of 2015 shows), the American preservation of shoegazing, Dave Sitek’s influence on both sound and an eBay gear binge, Beady Eye’s battle to stay in the vinyl world and trying to break into film- and TV-scoring by way of Steve Marriott. Oh, and also why an intense fandom of the Beatles and the Velvet Underground caused a schism in the Ride discography …  Continue reading

FIVE QUESTIONS: ANDY BELL

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Back in the saddle with Ride and running the Psychedelic Machine, the former Oasis, Beady Eye and Hurricane #1 man (surely by now we’ve answered the “Who the f*ck is …?” question) takes five from us. Continue reading

INTERVIEW: KEVIN ROWLAND

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“There was lots of people that were living in my area of northwest London—their dads were also builders … So some of their dads would have companies, and they’d be making big money. But they weren’t as exacting about the detail of what they were doing as my dad. I worked for him, and I would see. Something you would think would be alright was not good enough for him. He wanted it really, really right, you know? I’m like that.”

Kevin Rowland at length about why it took 27 years to make a new Dexys album, the art of conversational songs, the “indefinable” element Big Jim Paterson brings to a band and why songwriting is “f*cking hard word.” Oh, and also why younger musicians need to learn to appreciate dynamics … Continue reading